Antarctica Melting At Alarming Rate

ANTARCTICA

The study released today led by Eric Rignot from the University of California at Irvine, found that the rate of that ice loss has not been consistent, with ice disappearing faster in each successive decade.

A new study has revealed that melting of the ice and snow from the entire continent of Antarctica has accelerated by 280 per cent in the last four decades.

The study released on Monday led by Eric Rignot from the University of California at Irvine, found that the rate of that ice loss has not been consistent, with ice disappearing faster in each successive decade.

Ice loss in Antarctica has increased from 40 gigatonnes per year from 1979-90 all the way up to 252 gigatonnes per year from 2009-17, a 6-fold increase.

“Antarctica is melting away,” Rignot told CNN, “not just in a couple of places.”

According to the research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Antarctica holds a majority of the planet’s ice and if melted, would cause the average sea level to rise 188 feet.

The study looked at 176 different basins around Antarctica where ice drains into the ocean and found that the rate of melting is increasing, especially in areas where warm, salty water (known as circumpolar deep water or CDW) intrudes on edges of the ice sheets, which “vigorously melts the ice shelves” by reducing the glaciers that act as stop gaps between the ice sheet and the ocean.